To Pia in Germany

Pia said that she liked vintage cards and old fashioned things. I thought this reprint of a postcard from 1910 would be a pretty good fit for her!

This postcard shows the third home of President William McKinley in Poland, Ohio. This is my hometown and the location where the house was is now used as a bank. I drive past it every time I visit my mother’s house.

I think it is very neat that President McKinley grew up in the same village that I grew up in. I hope Pia thinks it is neat as well!


Postcards primarily sent via Postcrossing, an online community that allows people from all over the world to send and receive postcards.

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New U.S. Stamps – The Civil War: 1864

Today the United States Postal Service issued a new stamp collection, The Civil War: 1864. These are Forever stamps, currently at 49 cents. The description is as follows from their website:

The Civil War (1861-1865), the most wrenching chapter in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. The Postal Service™ continues its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing a souvenir sheet of two stamp designs for 2014.

One stamp depicts the 22nd United States Colored Troops engaged in the June 15-18, 1864, assault on Petersburg, Virginia, at the beginning of the Petersburg Campaign. The other stamp depicts Admiral David G. Farragut’s fleet at the Battle of Mobile Bay (Alabama) on August 5, 1864.

Art director Phil Jordan created the stamps using iconic images of the battles. The Petersburg Campaign stamp is a reproduction of a painting, dated 1892, by J. Andr_ Castaigne (painting courtesy of the West Point Museum, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York). The Battle of Mobile Bay stamp is a reproduction of a painting by Julian Oliver Davidson, published ca. 1886 by Louis Prang & Co.

For the background image on the souvenir sheet, Jordan used a photograph of Battery A, 2nd U.S. Colored Artillery (Light), Department of the Cumberland, 1864 (photograph courtesy of the Chicago History Museum, ICHi-07774).

The souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Ulysses S. Grant, Jeremiah Tate, Harrie Webster, and Howell Cobb. It also includes some of the lyrics from the Negro spiritual “O Mary, Don’t You Weep.”

From Frenc in Hungary

This postcard came in a direct swap with Frenc. He wanted my Born Free postcard and I requested this one he had of two giraffes.

Giraffes are one of my favorite exotic animals along with zebras. I loved this card and the lovely blue sky and clouds. I also liked the nurturing tone of this postcard with the mother giraffe feeding her baby. Plus, that baby’s tongue is to die for! So cute!


Postcards primarily sent via Postcrossing, an online community that allows people from all over the world to send and receive postcards.

From Jana in the Czech Republic

Jana sent me this postcard because she saw it in my Favorites. It was actually one of the first postcards I added to my Favorites. Something about the simplicity and vintage feel to it made me fall in love. And now I have one of my own!

I loved Jana’s message written on the back as well. She started off by mentioning that she chose this postcard because it was in my Favorites. Then she describes her life.

I’m studying combined studies at the Faculty of Arts and looking for a job. In my free time I’m singing in the choir and dancing swing and 50’s jive. I love reading, too – yesterday I finished “In Watermelon Sugar” (R. Brautigan).

What a neat life! She sings, dances, and loves to read. I love when people follow their passions! Thanks Jana!


Postcards primarily sent via Postcrossing, an online community that allows people from all over the world to send and receive postcards.

Happy Birthday Post Office!

On July 26, 1775 the United States Post Office was born! This was the predecessor to the United States Postal Service that we know and love today. It was formed out of a meeting of the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia. At the meeting, the following was agreed upon:

That a postmaster General be appointed for the United Colonies, who shall hold his office at Philadelphia, and shall be allowed a salary of 1000 dollars per an: for himself, and 340 dollars per an: for a secretary and Comptroller, with power to appoint such, and so many deputies as to him may seem proper and necessary.

That a line of posts be appointed under the direction of the Postmaster general, from Falmouth in New England to Savannah in Georgia, with as many cross posts as he shall think fit.

Benjamin Franklin was the first Postmaster General appointed under the Continental Congress. He served until Richard Bache was appointed on November 7, 1776.

New U.S. Stamps – Medal of Honor: Korean War

Today the United States Postal Service issued a new stamp collection, Medal of Honor: Korean War. These are Forever stamps, currently at 49 cents. The description is as follows:

In January 2012, the U.S. Postal Service® invited the last living Korean War Medal of Honor recipients to join in honoring the extraordinary courage of every member awarded the medal for their valorous actions during the war.

One stamp features a photograph of the Navy version of the Medal of Honor; the other stamp features a photograph of the Army version of the Medal of Honor. The second page includes a short piece of text and a key to the names of the recipients pictured in the cover photos. The names of all 145 recipients of the Medal of Honor from the Korean War are listed on page three. The remaining 18 stamps are found on the back page along with a quote describing why the Medal of Honor is awarded, “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty.” Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamps and the new format, working with photographs of the medals by Richard Frasier.

The Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for valor in combat, is presented “for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty.” In January 2012, the U.S. Postal Service® invited the last living recipients of the award from the Korean War to join in honoring the extraordinary courage of every individual who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the war.

More than 6.8 million people served with the American armed forces during the Korean War, but only 145 received the Medal of Honor. The road to receiving this medal is a long one. After being recommended, honorees are reviewed by a lengthy chain of command, starting with their superiors and ending with the Secretary of Defense and the President. More than two-thirds of the men who received the Medal of Honor for their actions during the Korean War were killed in action.

From Mukund in India

I was extremely excited and pleased to receive this postcard!! It was my first postcard from India, and I love getting postcards from new places! It also has an elephant on the front and I love elephants! Plus this one is just stinking adorable!

On the back of the postcard it describes the Indian Elephant:

Indian Elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) is a subspecies of Asian elephant and is found throughout South-east Asia. Indian elephants have been domesticated for hundreds of years for foresting and often battle.

The Indian elephant has smaller ears and a more curved spine than the African elephant. Unlike the African elephants, the female Indian elephants very rarely have tusks and if they have, they are barely visible and can only be seen when she opens her mouth.

In the picture is seen a baby elephant using her trunk as a fulcrum for climbing a steep bank as it comes out of bath in the river.

I thanked Mukund in my message to him for this wonderful postcard. It is one of my favorites!


Postcards primarily sent via Postcrossing, an online community that allows people from all over the world to send and receive postcards.